The use of sugar and its effects on the human body

Naturally occurring sugars, such as those found in fruit, and lactose, or milk sugar, come from sources that benefit your diet. However, the sugars and syrups added during food processing and preparation, called added sugars, are viewed as a detriment to a healthy diet.

The use of sugar and its effects on the human body

You bake it into pastries, cakes and cookies. You even sprinkle it all over your breakfast cereal or your oatmeal for added flavor.

It also lurks in almost all processed foods, including breads, meats, and even your favorite condiments like Worcestershire sauce and ketchup.

Most people view sugary foods as tasty, satisfying and irresistible treats. But I believe that there are three words that can more accurately describe sugar: This intense addiction to sugar is becoming rampant, not just among adults, but in children as well.

Importance of Sugar in the Human Body | Healthy Eating | SF Gate

But how exactly does sugar work in your body, and what are the side effects can excess sugar have on your health? Today, an average American consumes about 32 teaspoons of sugar per day. This highly processed form of sugar is cheaper to produce, yet 20 percent sweeter than regular table sugar, which is why many food and beverage manufacturers decided to use it in their products.

HFCS is found in almost all types of processed foods and drinks today. Just take a look at this infographic to see just how much fructose is hiding in some of the most common foods you eat. The bad news is that the human body is not made to consume excessive amounts of sugar, especially in the form of fructose.

In fact, your body metabolizes fructose differently than sugar. It is actually a hepatotoxin and is metabolized directly into fat — factors that can cause a whole host of problems that can have far-reaching effects on your health. Robert Lustig, a professor of Clinical Pediatrics in the Division of Endocrinology in the University of California and a pioneer in decoding sugar metabolism, says that your body can safely metabolize at least six teaspoons of added sugar per day.

The use of sugar and its effects on the human body

But since most Americans are consuming over three times that amount, a majority of the excess sugar becomes metabolized into body fat — leading to all the debilitating chronic metabolic diseases that many people are struggling with.

Here are some of the effects that excessive sugar intake has on your health: The effects of too much sugar or fructose can be likened to the effects of alcohol. This severely taxes and overloads the organ, leading to potential liver damage.

It fails to stimulate insulin, which in turn fails to suppress ghrelin, or "the hunger hormone," which then fails to stimulate leptin or "the satiety hormone.

Eating too much sugar causes a barrage of symptoms known as classic metabolic syndrome. High uric acid levels 6 are a risk factor for heart and kidney disease.

In fact, the connection between fructose, metabolic syndrome and your uric acid is now so clear that your uric acid level can now be used as a marker for fructose toxicity. Sugar Increases Your Risk of Disease One of the most severe effects of eating too much sugar is its potential to damage your liver, leading to a condition known as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease NAFLD.

Lustig explained the three similarities between alcohol and fructose: This promotes insulin resistance, fatty liver and dyslipidemia abnormal fat levels in your blood. This causes superoxide free radicals to form, resulting in inflammation — a condition that can be also caused by acetaldehyde, a metabolite of ethanol.Sucralose (Splenda) is NOT a sugar, despite its sugar-like name and deceptive marketing slogan, "made from sugar." It's a chlorinated artificial sweetener in line with aspartame and saccharin, with detrimental health effects to match.

Sucralose (Splenda) is NOT a sugar, despite its sugar-like name and deceptive marketing slogan, “made from sugar.” It’s a chlorinated artificial sweetener in line with aspartame and saccharin, with detrimental health effects to match.

Today, an average American consumes about 22 teaspoons of sugar per day, which amounts to 77 pounds of sugar per year; The human body is not made to consume excessive amounts of sugar, especially fructose. Your body cannot absorb the disaccharide, or two-sugar molecule, as is, so it must first sever the chemical link connecting the two sugars.

The enzyme sucrase in your small intestine assists with the breakdown of sucrose into fructose and glucose. The primary function of sugar in your body metabolism is to provide energy to power your activities.

Additionally, sugar can convert to a stored form of energy in your body, and it plays a role in conserving your lean muscle nationwidesecretarial.comd: Jun 17, Processed varieties, on the other hand, provide none of these benefits and instead create these harmful effects of sugar in the body: Stresses the Liver: “When we eat fructose, it goes to the liver.

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